The Dominant Dog – Dealing with Dominance in Dogs

What is a dominant dog?

Some people attribute all problem behaviors to “dominance“, while others do not want to use the “dominant dog” label at all. The truth, as always, is somewhere in-between.

It is useful to recognize dominant behaviors in our dog, so that we can better manage him, keep him safe, and set him up for success. Refusing to use the word dominance, or denying its existence in dogs, is unhelpful.

Any pack animal including humans and dogs, have to deal with dominance issues, because it is part of pack dynamics.

Similarly, trying to explain everything away by using the dominant dog label or excuse, is also unhelpful. To really fix a problem behavior, we want to fully understand it, and correctly identify its source. For example, a dog may show aggression because of dominance. However, dog aggression can also be the result of fear, stress, play, curiosity, boredom, or something else.

Dog Dominance

Dominance is a fluid concept.


Dogs are not dominant all of the time.

For example, many dogs will show greater dominance when they are on home turf, or when their owners are around. Under different circumstances, these same dogs may become less assertive, or may even become submissive.

Observe our dog carefully, and identify when he is more likely to show dominance, and why.

Dominance is a relative concept.

My Shiba Inu, for example, is more dominant than most dogs I have owned. He challenges me more frequently, and is constantly testing his boundaries. He has a dominant body posture, and he will not back down when challenged by other dogs.

My Siberian Husky, is a more submissive dog. She usually stops whatever she is doing, when I tell her to. She very quickly backs down, and uses submissive body language, when confronted by other dogs.

However, this does not mean that my Husky will always back down, or never show any dominance behavior. She simply prefers to avoid conflict, and has learned that she usually gets more, by seeking a peaceful resolution. I make sure to encourage this behavior, by rewarding calmness and conflict avoidance very well.

What is a Dominant Dog?

  1. A dominant dog will likely respond with aggression when he is frustrated, or when he feels threatened. He may also redirect that aggression onto us, if we try to physically engage him.
  2. A dominant dog is more forceful when it comes to fulfilling his own needs and goals. He is not afraid to challenge those around him, and to continually test his boundaries. My Shiba Inu is always testing to see if particular rules, such as the no getting on furniture rule, still hold true.
  3. A dominant dog is more likely to fight, and less likely to submit or run away. My Shiba Inu likes playing with other dogs, but he generally does not get along with dogs who try to dominate him. If challenged, he will not back down, and this can result in a dog fight.

Dealing with a Dominant Dog


1. A dominant dog needs a calm and assertive pack leader.

Being angry and shouting at our dog, will only worsen his behavior. Fear and uncertainty will increase his level of stress, and cause him to behave in a more erratic fashion.

The best way to deal with a dominant dog is to remain calm, and firmly remove him from the environment or object, that is causing him to act out.

2. Contrary to common belief, physical force or physical corrections is NOT a good way to deal with dominant dogs.

If not perfectly executed (with perfect timing, force, and technique), a physical correction may further frustrate our dog, and cause him to get more aggressive.

Instead, stay calm, keep physical interactions to a minimum, and quickly leave the stressful situation. In addition, using physical force against a dog, may end up teaching him the wrong lesson; in particular, use violence against violence.

True alpha dogs lead by controlling the pack’s resources. We can control our dog’s resources by following the NILIF (Nothing in Life is Free) program, and using reward obedience training.

3. A dominant dog should be carefully managed and supervised.

We want to step in and stop any aggressive behaviors, before our dog escalates and loses control. Prevention is key when dealing with a dominant dog. It stops him from practicing aggressive behaviors, and it enforces the important lesson that we are calm, and in charge.

4. A dominant dog should have more rules.

To become a good pack leader, it is important to develop a set of house rules and some structure, for our dog to follow. Always be consistent with enforcing all of those rules.

My Shiba Inu’s most important house rules include –

5. A dominant dog should have frequent obedience training sessions.

Schedule at least two or more short (10 – 15 minutes) obedience training sessions with our dog, every day. It is a good idea to keep up with obedience exercises, throughout a dog’s life. This keeps him mentally sharp, and makes it clear that we are in charge.

6. Use proper equipment to control a dominant dog.

When dealing with aggression, safety should always be a primary concern.

Use whatever equipment is necessary, to keep all the people around our dominant dog safe. A drag lead may also be useful because it gives us good control of our dog, without having to lay hands on him or his collar, and without resorting to chasing games.

If our dog has a bite history, it may be necessary to use a muzzle. I like the basket muzzle because it does not overly constrain a dog’s mouth, and is more comfortable. A basket muzzle will still allow a dog to eat and pant.

Be careful not to aggravate our dog’s aggressive behavior by overly constraining him, and causing barrier frustration. When in doubt, consult a professional trainer.

7. Always set our dominant dog up for success.

Try to minimize the number of dominant displays. Identify objects (e.g. other dogs, cats) and environmental conditions (e.g. loud noise) that trigger dominant behaviors, and avoid those triggers.

Then, gradually desensitize our dog to those events, in a controlled fashion.

Many dog behavioral issues, including resource guarding, biting people, dog-to-dog aggression, sensitivity to handling, growling at humans, and general disobedience, are often attributed to “the dominant dog“.

However, each of these problems are unique, and complex. They are usually the result of many factors, one of which may be dominance. In fact, many behavioral issues are the result of stress and fear, and have nothing whatsoever to do with dominance.

When dealing with dog behavioral issues, it is best to keep an open mind.

Observe our dog and his environment carefully. Identify the triggers for his aggressive behavior, and try to understand why he is responding in this way. If his aggression is extreme (e.g. he is breaking skin, and/or causing puncture wounds), hire a professional trainer to help us carefully trouble-shoot the problems.

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Comments

  1. zoe says

    Please help! my mum has a spaniel cross that even as a puppy was aggressive and timid. you can visit my mother and he will come up excited then when you go to show affection he starts growling. my mum has let him rule the house eg on the sofa with her even sleeps with her. when he gets aggressive she tells us to be careful and gets him up on the chair with her. when you go to leave and kiss her goodbye he goes for you and she tells you to be careful!. she is scared of him and hence he gets away with anything he does. on a serious note he has bitten her twice now and has bitten my granddad and my 2 year old nephew before and most recently tonight my nephew, sister & my mum in the same attack which was unprovoked. after this she had him sitting up on the sofa with her!! she is in total denial and blames everyone else which I feel is not fair as surely if you let a dog get away with biting anyone for no reason it is going to do it again & again. the attacks are getting more vicious and more frequent and she defends him. please advise what you feel is appropriate action as this has now caused a problem as she is blaming my sister when clearly being unprovoked this is not right! please please help…

    • shibashake says

      I would get help from a good professional trainer. It is usually easier to accept dog advice from an outside professional, rather than from family or friends. In addition, dog behavior is very context dependent, so especially in cases of aggression, it is usually a good idea to consult with a professional who can observe the dog within his normal environment and routine.
      http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/finding-professional-help
      https://apdt.com/pet-owners/choosing-a-trainer/

      When I was having issues with my Shiba Inu (Sephy), we visited with several trainers. The dog training field is not well regulated, so it is not always easy to find a good trainer. However, I learned some really useful things from the ones I visited with. I also read up a lot on dog behavior so that I could more easily screen out the bad trainers, and could better read and understand Sephy.
      More on where I get my dog training and dog behavior information.

      I also made sure to always keep things safe by using management equipment such as leashes, gates, and a basket muzzle if necessary. If my dog should accidentally hurt someone and it gets reported, it would be really bad news for him. Preventing accidental attacks is important not just for the people around, but also to keep our dogs safe.

  2. Tiffany says

    We have had Jackson out Bassett hound ( Jackson)for 5 years, and our shorkie for 4 years. We just rescued a shih tzu (dusty)who is 7 and came from a home where he wasn’t alpha. However, dusty isn’t neutered. I don’t see dusty showing behaviors of alpha. But Jackson won’t stop attacking him. Any toys, treats I understand. But dusty will just be walking by Jackson and Jackson will full on attack dusty. We give them all the same attention. However, I do get scared and yell when Jackson attacks, then lick him in time out for 30 minutes. I know I’m doing this all wrong. Jackson will attack the shorkie once in a while, but will attack dusty everytime he walks near. I don’t know what to do. Help!

  3. Erin says

    Hello,

    I have a 8 month old border collie lab great pyreneese mix. We adopted him at 4.5 months old after being returned from his previous owners for his fear of the husband. At first he would pee whenever my husband went to pet him. We were able to work through that in a few days. We thought that was a sign of being submissive.

    Now we are running into extreme fits when we leave. Our neighbors have mentioned his barking a time or two. We left him outside he destroyed the door frame. We put him in his kennel and he goes berserk. He refuses to eat any treats when in the crate and will actually push them or his favorite toy out of the crate. He did go potty in there twice. It’s a wire crate and he’s managed to eat the handles off and also bend the frame itself trying to get out. He also destroyed the bed that was in there. (He has a crate upstairs that he sleeps in no problem, loves going in there, sleeps like a lamb).

    We aren’t sure if this signs of separation anxiety, or if it’s dominance behavior and we have allowed him to believe he is pack leader and he is upset we are leaving him without him saying it was OK.

    He gets a walk in the am and a walk in the pm and swimming when I get home if it’s hot.

    I did let him sit on my lap (Bad girl, I know, I didn’t know that was bad thing at the time, he’s not allowed to do that anymore). When he did sit on my lap it was up and high above my head.
    He also will try to run us over to get through the doorway first or go up and down stairs.
    He ignores commands he knows. 8 tries to get him to sit/down/stay etc.. He will beg or whine and try to walk around us, anything but do what we are asking. (Not always, but this has been increasing each day).
    He knows there are places he isn’t allowed but deliberately goes back there anyway. He gets yelled at but he doesn’t really seem to care. Or he does.. sorta.. but it isn’t anything to stop him from hoping back over there.

    We also will leave him in the house to go into the garage or get the mail, he doesn’t destroy anything, but starts crying and barking like a mad man. And when we come back into the house he barks at us and jumps up.

    This has all started just in the beginning of June. We are a little dumbfounded and aren’t sure what to do.

    We have started no attention without earning it first, again, 8 tries later..

    I’m scared he’s going to hurt himself by trying to get out of the crate, and I am concerned about his mental health, because I know he’s extremely stressed.

    Help?? Ideas? Anything?

    Thanks,

    Erin

  4. Elizabet Vargas says

    Hello, I have a 1 year old Siberian Husky. He just graduated beginner training. And is doing great!
    However; whenever we take him to the dog park he is a little too rough when playing with the other dogs which always doesn’t work out too well. He is a big alpha dog. But when he’s playing too rough it sometimes ends with the other dogs getting upset. Is there any way to get him to play in a manor that isn’t too rough or frustrates the other dogs? Also, I can’t always tell if he’s just playing or getting aggressive.

  5. kaz says

    Hi there,

    We have 2 boy siberian huskys.We have only recently taken one on two days ago as friends were moving. Our boy Kaizer made his stand the first night and was very dominate being in his own home they had 2 very haunting fights 1 we could break up the other Drew blood from they new boys ear so we separated them for a while. Today they played fine few niggles now and then but is Kaizer just being TOO dominate?? took them for a run and when Kaizer seen Shogun (new boy) being faster he went to attack him. He stands on him and growls, standing over him and bites him were shogun will lie down and then Kaizer will walk off once shogun bows to him. If shogun goes somewhere Kaizer usually sits he’ll go to bite and growl him stand on him etc what’s the best way to treat the situation ?? Thanks as I don’t want shogun to become stressed and nervous

    • shibashake says

      Some things that help keep things friendly with my dogs-
      1. I set up clear dog-to-dog interaction rules.
      2. I manage their excitement level.
      3. I supervise closely during play, food, and other times where there may be conflict, so that I can redirect or resolve before they escalate.

      More on what I do to keep the peace at home with my dogs.

      However, given that the dogs are fighting, it is probably best to get help from a good professional trainer so that both people and dogs stay safe. We visited with several trainers when going through a difficult period with our Shiba Inu.
      http://www.apdt.com/pet-owners/choosing-a-trainer/

  6. Sally says

    Hi there, need a bit of assistance. We have 2 siberian husky pups, they are sisters from the same litter. They have been good at settling into our home. We have a 6 year old daughter who loves them dearly and they love her. We have now come across a problem, they are both getting jealous. My daughter tries to give them both loving at the same time, but as soon as she is out the way they both attack each other to the point that they have drawn blood several times now. I’m worried that they are going to hurt each other badly or hurt me or my daughter as I can not break up the fight! Is this a phase they will grow out of, or is this something more serious?!!

    • shibashake says

      How old are they? How long have you had them? What kind of training are they used to? What is their routine like? How much daily exercise do they get?

      In cases of aggression, it is usually best to get help from a good professional trainer, especially when there is a young child in the household. Dog behavior is very context dependent, so it is often helpful to have a good trainer visit with the dogs, read their body language, as well as see their routine and environment.
      http://www.apdt.com/pet-owners/choosing-a-trainer/

      Some things that I do to help keep the peace at home -
      1. I set up a fixed routine and a consistent set of rules, including clear dog to dog interaction rules.
      2. I supervise them closely during play and food time so that I can manage their excitement level and prevent any conflicts from occurring. If there are any conflicts, I make sure to stop things *before* they escalate into anything serious. While under supervision, I use management equipment such as a flat collar and leashes if needed.
      3. I try to set them up for success. I do group obedience training and make sure to reward them extremely well when they are calm and working together for me. I try to maximize successful together time and minimize negative encounters.
      4. I follow the Nothing in Life is Free program with all of my dogs.
      5. I try to give them many positive outlets to release their energy, e.g. long daily walks, structured games with me, working for their food, etc.

      More on what I do to help my dogs get along.
      More on what I do to retrain my dog’s bad behavior.

  7. Ginny Forbes says

    My sheba that’s a female dominates me when I go to give my mom a goodnight hug and kiss, why is this?(if she’s laying on my dad’s lap when I say goodnight she doesn’t but she watches me.) How can I get her to stop other than having my dad yelling at her?

    • shibashake says

      What exactly do you mean by “dominates” you? Does she show aggression? What exactly does she do? What does your mom do when that happens? What kind of training is she used to? Who mostly trains her? Who mostly feeds and exercises her? Are there rules in the house? What is her routine like? What is your regular daily interaction with her?

  8. Ben says

    I have 3.5 year old male Labrador that has not been neutered. He is a very social able dog who gets a lot of attention. He is around myself or my dad for a majority of the nights, morning, and evenings. He is in a large pen with two other smaller dogs. He does not food guard and for the most parts listens well. He probably gets away with a lot of bad habits like sleeping on the bed with me and begging. I believe he favors my dad and recognizes my dad as the alpha male. Recently my Father was out of town for 12 days so it was just me and my lab. Typically I get home later and the evening and he has been fed and is at my parents house and I take him from there and he usually settles in for the night. Lately, he has begun to growl when I first make contact with him, just petting. The first time I scolded him verbally and he continued to growl and then changed my tone and called him to me and continued to pet him and he was fine the rest of the night. The second night very similar growled, I did not scold him just backed off came back with a different tone. I did however test it out a little. I stared him directly in the eye with a scowl and he would growl and then I would change my tone and demeanor. I tried this a couple times and that was the typical outcome. And again he went home with me and everything was fine. Finally tonight (third time) He didn’t come greet me when I came in he still I called him and fed him a few treats and went about my business eating my dinner. When it was time to go I bent over to pet him and he growled again I sat on the floor and changed my tone and he was fine. It seems like he may be scared or is he challenging me. I am not sure, I have noticed similar behavior with one of the other dog most cases when they see each other he approaches the other dog with his hackles and tale straight up and that dog rolls over very submissive like and they are fine the rest of the day. He has growled and lunged at other dogs on occasion but he is always on the leash and I pull him back and scold him. I would appreciate another perspective and I have tried to provide a lot of case.

    • shibashake says

      Large changes in a dog’s environment and routine, e.g. someone important being away, can create uncertainty and stress for a dog, and this can lead to changes in behavior. Staring down our dog when he is already anxious, can create more uncertainty and stress, and may make him feel more threatened.

      I help my dog by setting up a fixed routine and a consistent set of rules. This helps him to understand what to expect from me, and what I expect from him in return. I further reinforce leadership by making my dog work for the things that he wants most.

      I set my dog up for success by -
      a) Building trust through exercise, play, walks, and more,
      b) Managing his environment and excitement level,
      c) Protecting him from stressful situations that he is not ready to handle.

  9. Etain says

    Hi I have a female husky/border collie mix that is very dominant over the other two dogs I have (male and female) who are both very submissive. She never fights with them but often guards food and snarls if there is food around.

    I think she was actually the runt of the litter! And she will never look me in the eye if I give out to her so I also think she can be a bit of a coward.

    She was never aggressive towards other dogs unless they were in my house then she would get into a fight. Whenever she encounters another dog when I bring all of them out for a run she sticks her back hair up and puts her head down low and looks aggressive however she never used to do anything, her tail would be wagging within a few minutes and she would play with the other dog. This still happens sometimes but she has also started to fight with some of them, i noticed a few months ago she started resting her head on the back of dogs necks in a dominant way, this soon escalated into fights if the other dog didn’t like it.

    She never draws blood from the other dog when she fights but it still looks serious and scary, today she lay completely on top of the other dog and pinned it to the ground and stayed like that for a few minutes. She has met the dog she fought with today before and has never had a problem with it until today, I noticed she was playing with it until I walked up, then she started growling at it and it turned into a fight.

    She fights with boy and girl dogs (sometime I think she thinks she’s a boy as she pees with her leg up against trees?). She always snarling at me when she is excited (she never bites just makes husky noises and snarls) and also she always puts her paw on me as she wants attention a lot.

    I don’t know what to do I feel like I’ve tried everything .eg giving out and smacking her and also I tried being nice and talking to her in a calm voice and petting her when her back hair sticks up but nothing seems to work. she is extremely independent and likes to run off and do what she wants and will not listen to me unless I have treats she will sometimes run back. I Feel so embaressed when she fights other dogs and feel like shes getting worse no matter how hard I try, just wondering if you have any advice, thanks :)

    • shibashake says

      Hello Etain,
      As I understand it, aggressive behavior can be the result of many things, including fear. For example, fearful dogs may fight back when they “feel” threatened and do not think they have any other options available. My Huskies are more submissive, and they usually do not like to keep eye contact for long. My Shiba is a more dominant dog, and he is very comfortable with staring back at people.

      Here is a short article from UCDavis on aggression and dominance.

      My Shiba is also very sensitive to my energy and to the energy of the people around him. If I am fearful, stressed, frustrated, or angry, he will pick up on that, get stressed himself, and act even more crazy. He started behaving much better after I started controlling my own energy.

      I help my dogs get along at home by setting up clear dog-to-dog interaction rules, and then slowly teaching them those rules. I try to be calm and very consistent while training them. In this way, they fully understand what to expect from each other, what to expect from me, and what I expect from them. The key with my dogs is to minimize bad experiences and maximize successes. The more calm, positive experiences they have with each other, the more relaxed they become in the future. The opposite is also true.
      More on what I do to help my dogs get along.

      With my Shiba Inu, I also did dog-to-dog desensitization exercises to teach him to be more calm with other dogs.

      I pick my dogs’ friends carefully, supervise them closely during play, manage their excitement level, and try my best to set them up for success. When we were having problems with Shiba, we also visited with several good professional trainers who could observe him interacting with other dogs, and help us develop a plan for retraining. In cases of aggression, it is usually safest to get help from a professional trainer.
      http://www.apdt.com/pet-owners/choosing-a-trainer/

  10. Amanda says

    Hi,
    I have a female German Shepherd who, although submissive, friendly, and obedient to humans and male dogs, gets very dominant to other female dogs, no matter their age or whether they are fixed or not. She is extremely playful and gentle with male dogs, children, and other people, but is very unreliable around female dogs. Do you have any suggestions to help overcome or control this dominant behavior towards other female dogs?
    Thank you!
    -Amanda

  11. Natalie says

    Hi,
    I have a 9mo old Shiba Inu and currently her training (although still stubborn at times) is going well. My issue and question arises with the interaction when I bring her to visit and play with her mother at my friends house who owns the mother.

    The first meeting that my Shiba and her mother had after seperation was fine, which was still only a week or two after having got her. However now that my Shiba is older, the next interaction the mother was very aggressive dominat toward my Shiba. My Shiba showed complete submission and did not try to defy the dominance yet the mother was agressive to the point the pup yelped and cried out (unsure if this was bc of being hurt or she didn’t like what was going on).
    After this “introductory period” though they played fine but the period lasted for close to 5 minutes.
    Now I would assume this was a one time thing but EVERYtime I bring my Shiba over there is a “introductory period” where the mother has to be so dominant she is very agressive. One of the interactions I brought the mother over to my house where I also own an older Lab mix that is Alpha in the house and the mother Shiba attacked in agressive domminance my Lab to the point after seperating the dogs my Lab was shaking.
    I have spoken with my friend the owner of the mother mentioning I think perhaps the mother Shiba and her pup that I own may need to be more familiar for this aggression to stop. But I have been told that the mother has displayed this before to the other pups in the litter (as they were all adopted by friends of the owner of the Mother) as well as other female and alpha dogs. Yet when you bring the mother to the dog park she is perfectly composed and no issues that I am aware of.
    I recently found out the mother can become so agressive that she receltly bit the husband of the owner.
    My question is: should I continue to bring my Shiba around her mother if she is going to be that agressive in dominance to her initially despite being told “no” and “stop”? I understand displaying some dominance is normal but the extent of the aggression is not anything I have found “normal” with any dog(s) I’ve owned and I’ve had dogs all my life/growing up (though this is my first time owning a Shiba). My other question is, aside pointing the owners to the suggestions on the site, because I’m not sure what they do at home in training and such with the mother, as well as I don’t want to tell them what to do or how to train their dog, what would you suggest about this situation since the problem is regarding another persons dog? I’m concerned if I step on toes it could cause a major issue so hoping to handle this in best way.
    Looking for help w another’s dog

    • shibashake says

      Hello Natalie,

      In terms of socialization, I pick my dogs’ playmates carefully and I only let them meet or play with dogs that I know they will be successful with. I want to maximize successes so that they will gain confidence around other dogs, and learn to associate other dogs with play and positive events. This is not always possible, as sometimes, there are loose dogs in my neighborhood and we have gotten charged a bunch of times, but I try my best.
      Here is a bit more on my dog socialization experiences.

      In terms of someone else’s dog, I generally do not give opinions, advice, or anything else unless asked to. Even then, I try to be very careful because in my experience, people do not like hearing anything even mildly negative about their kids or dogs. On my site I write about experiences with my own dogs, but even then, there are a bunch of people who get angry because what I write does not fully agree with their own view of the World.

      I believe that the desire for change must come from the people themselves, when they are ready. I do, however, have control of my own actions, so I choose my dogs’ friends carefully, and at other times, we just avoid.

      Just my opinion though. Big hugs to your furry gang! :D

  12. Steph says

    I have a question– We have had a 14 month old female Aussie since she was a puppy. She sounds a lot like your Shiba- tests the limits all the time. She has been through a ton of obedience training, but she still acts up around other dogs. She has never been agressive to the point that she has physically hurt another dog, she is very playful and has a ton of energy. We rescued a male Border Collie/Newfoundland mix (hes about 20 months old) mix about 2 weeks ago and I think she is having some trouble adjusting. When we let them outside my Aussie jumps and bites at the scruff of my new dog- she doesn’t give up. I can’t get her to leave him alone, she always did this at daycare and also when we visit the dog park. I also know this is a typical Aussie behavior. I have been able to control the behavior inside, but when she goes outside, its a different story. I have tried drag lines, spray bottles, nothing is working. I have also tried using a high value treat and having her “train” while he is outside. This works, but as soon as I go in, she’s back at it again….Help!

    • shibashake says

      With my dogs, I set up clear dog-to-dog interaction rules. I supervise during play, manage their excitement level, and make sure everyone follows the rules.

      I have a three legged dog, so I do not allow rough play with her, and I do not allow my other dogs to chase her. I always supervise when she is involved in play. I do not leave her outside unsupervised, with another dog.

      Here is more on what I do while introducing a new dog.

      My dogs are very good at observation. If they see that they can get away with certain behaviors when I am not around, then they will wait until I am not there to do it.

      For example, Husky Lara likes to dig. When left alone in the backyard, she will sometimes start to dig, especially if she smells earth critter activity. To train her not to dig, I leave her outside, but I make sure to watch from inside the house. As soon as I notice the digging behavior, I no-mark, and go out to stop her if necessary. If she keeps digging, she loses outside privileges.

      I was very consistent about this during the training period, and she learned that even when I am not there, I am still supervising her. To stop the behavior, I have to make sure to consistently catch it every time, and to be able to stop it quickly, before she gets rewarded for it (for example by catching a mouse, or starting a fun game). If every time she tries to dig, I stop the behavior and she doesn’t get anything, it becomes a very unrewarding behavior.

      At the same time, I give her other outlets for her digging energy. I take her to places where she can dig, and we also have an un-landscaped section in the backyard where she can dig.

  13. Tina says

    Hi!
    I have an almost 11 years old German Shepperd/Malamute mix, I live with my friend who has a 3 years old Russian Toy Terrier. They’re the best of friends.

    Our problem is that our friend is moving in with us and her dogs are untrained dominant and aggressive.

    She has one 3 years old female Chinese Shar-Pei, she can play with our dogs and go lay down relax and some hours later just get up and go for the throat on the other dogs. In general she’s calm and submissive to us, but not people she doesn’t know she’s not very trusting.

    She also has an 2 years Boerboel. He used to be playful now he’s becoming aggressive and dominant and we can’t get our dogs to get along. I’ve trained my dog rigorously through the years after he had problems getting along with other dogs after being attacked and hurt.
    So I can handle him and calm him down and usually get him to get along with other big male dominant dogs if I have to.
    But my friend never trained her dog and he’s becoming dangerous, challenging everything and staring back at any command, he’s very food fixated and I’m worried he’s going to attack even people when they take it away from him soon.

    We can’t make him even walk calmly beside my dog without him trying to pull off his leash and try to get into a fight.
    I feel that I can’t create a safe environment for them to get along when he’s getting aggressive just by the sight of my dog, and my dog responds to that but even after trying many times his owner can’t calm him down and get him out of attacking state. Do you have any tips on how I can handle the situation and what we should do? I know my post is messy but I’m just in over my head and don’t know what to do, I don’t want to come home and find either of the dogs dead on the floor from a fight.
    Please help, my dog is already old from age even though it doesn’t show very well, I don’t want to inflict a stressful dangerous environment on him.
    Please help

    • shibashake says

      With my dogs, I set up clear dog-to-dog interaction rules. I supervise new, in-training dogs carefully, and slowly teach them what my house rules are. I *do not* allow my dogs to physically correct each other. If there are conflicts, I deal with it early, before it escalates, which is why supervision is key.

      If I am unable to supervise, I keep my dogs safely separated, until I am *absolutely sure* that there will be no problems.

      Given what you describe, it is probably best to get help from a good professional trainer.
      http://www.apdt.com/pet-owners/choosing-a-trainer/

  14. Gwen says

    Hey! I have a few questions! I have a two year old male chocolate lane who is EXTREMLY dominant. With other dogs, if they do something they know is bad and you say their name, they kinda slink away, he does not. He stands tall and square, looks you in the eye and continues. Tonight, I told him to go in his kennel for bed time, and he stood there looking at me. I walked towards him to lead him by his collar, not angry or anything, and he snapped at me. He has never bitten anyone or hardly ever growled at anyone. He continued to growl at me, teeth bared. This is very weird for him, he is a very docile dog, even though he is dominant. He is also EXTREMLY food aggressive. Not to a point of biting us, but we just steer clear while he’s eating. He gets very rigid and eats quickly, moving so you are unable to get by him towards his food. But we’ve never taken his food. Hew as the biggest in his litter. Please help. I have a little brother who plays with him a lot and I don’t want him getting hurt. What do I do?

  15. Danielle McDaris says

    Help!!!
    Last month my family and I, along with our two dogs moved into an RV. Recently, our female (German Shorthair Pointer/Greyhound mix) has been “staring down” & attacking our male (German Shorthair Pointer/Beagle mix). We seperate them when they are being fed and try to seperate them so they can have their space. Sombra (female) is larger than Eddie (male) & is also dominant. We have had Eddie for 6 years & adopted Sombra 2 years ago. They are roughly three years apart. Most of the time they play or sleep near each other, but lately Sombra has been very mean to Eddie. We take them to a park nearby where they run and play. Please help!! We love them both very much but it’s a big problem!!
    Thanks!
    -Danielle

    • shibashake says

      Moving can be very stressful for both people and dogs, especially if there is now less space. When I moved, I quickly set up a routine and consistent set of rules for my dogs. This creates certainty, which helps to reduce stress. It also helps them to understand what to expect from each other, what to expect from the people in the house, and what I expect from them in return.

      More on what I do to help my dogs get along.

      I also increased the length of my Shiba Inu’s daily walks so he had a good positive outlet to release his stressful energy.

      Dog behavior is very context dependent though, so the temperament and environment of the dogs matter a lot. In cases of aggression, it can be especially helpful to consult with a good professional trainer. I visited with several when I was having difficulties with my Shiba.
      http://www.apdt.com/pet-owners/choosing-a-trainer/

  16. Cecille says

    Dear Shiba expert,

    I’ve been reading up on your Shiba blog and I’ve been trying to get your expertise on something.

    I recently adopted two Shibas, about a month ago. They were brothers from the same litter, are both 1.5 years of age, but with drastically different personalities. One of them, besides being food obsessed and having the occasional accident is the perfect pet. He doesn’t whine, doesn’t poo in his kennel, gets along well with my Lab, and will approach and be nice to every dog and human he ever meets.

    The other one, however, is an absolute TERROR. He is ferocious with my lab, and is aggressive towards any foreign thing that he sees, whether it be human, squirrel, cat, or dog. When he sees said foreign objects, he will do the infamous SHIBA SCREAM, over and over and over again and will absolutely not stop and possibly try to attack said foreign object. He also cannot be crated. The first few days with us, he did not whine, but that was before he developed an attachment to us. After that, he always does the infamous SHIBA SCREAM. Over and over again. Nothing could deter this dog. He does not tire, his brother’s company in the crate does not comfort him, and toys or bones do not soothe him. He will scream 24/7. The extent of his separation anxiety is beyond explanation.

    However, inside, he is a really sweet dog. He gives hugs and kisses incessantly and is not aggressive towards me and my family. We all love him to pieces too. However, I don’t know how much longer my family or the neighbors can take the SHIBA SCREAM. I want to take responsibility for adopting him and don’t want to separate him from his brother, but I am honestly at a loss for what to do.

    PLEASE HELP,
    Cecille

    • shibashake says

      Heh, I am no Shiba expert. I actually had a very difficult time with my Shiba in the beginning, which is why I started this site to write about our experiences.

      In terms of separation anxiety, Sephy had some of it in the beginning. I helped him get over it by very slowly getting him used to alone time. I first start with very very short periods of alone time (a few seconds) and I slowly build it up from there. Here is a bit more on what I did.

      Sephy sleeps with us at night in the bedroom. Being close to us and being able to see us really helped him to settle down, especially in the beginning.

      Here is a bit more on how I got Sephy comfortable with his crate.

  17. Vishakha says

    I hand raised my dogsince she was just 5 days old (did it wrong, didnt set rules etc ) . she became very very dominant agressive , attacked me for silly reasons , I got professional help and she has never growled/attacked me since.INfact she is a GREAT DOG , but only around me . put her around my mom(whos pretty soft ) and its disastrous. Also when Im sleeping she sits by my bed and gaurds me ie.no one can enter the room . If shes sleeping in the room ( any room) she growls at anyone who enters excluding me . So shes prefect with me. How do react when she growls at others ? I say no and she stops , but Im not always in the room or in the house .

  18. Emma says

    Hi,

    My parents just moved to Bali down the road from where my uncle lives (we are originally from Australia). About two weeks ago, my uncle found three puppies being attacked by the side of the road and started to care for them. He later found out that they had been taken from a man who stole them to sell to the government for $7.50 each, and he had them tied by the neck to the handle of his motorbike.

    The dogs all look completely different, but the vet said they were from the same litter. There are 2 boys and 1 girl. The girl is very aggressive and dominant, while one boy is the runt and quite small, and the other boy is very quiet and just sleeps all the time. The girl has begun to fight the two boys a lot in the last few days. Just today, she attacked the quiet boy and bit his neck, we had to spray her with a hose to get her to stop. If we pat one of the boys, she will push through so we can pat her. She steals all of their food and whatever toy they have. She even sits on them. The boys are starting to learn to fight back but they aren’t as big or strong.

    I have read a few articles saying that we should treat her as the dominant dog and give her her food first etc but it sounds very unfair. My uncle is keeping two of the puppies to be guard dogs (the girl will obviously be very good at it, not so much the quiet one) and my parents will be keeping the runt who will hopefully be a bit of a guard dog. The articles have said that 99% of the time the dogs will only fight in the presence of the owners, but that isn’t the case with these puppies.

    I’m very scared that the girl will severely hurt the other two as they are much smaller than her and have less energy. None of the puppies are going to be inside dogs and sleep/eat outside. Could you please give us some advice on what to do? We haven’t even been able to teach them their names yet or any other commands so it’s very difficult.

    Thank you so much!
    Emma

    • shibashake says

      Hello Emma,

      For such aggression issues, it is usually best to get help from a professional trainer. This will help ensure the safety of all the people as well as the dogs.

      I have a three legged dog, so in my house I set up clear dog-to-dog interaction rules. I *do not* allow any bullying, stealing, or other anti-social behavior. I also set up a fixed routine and clear boundaries so that my dogs understand what I expect from them and what they can expect from me.

      Here is an article on how I trained my Husky puppy.

      Here is a bit more on how I teach my dogs to get along.

      Here is more on how dogs learn.

      Note however, that dog behavior is very dependent on temperament and surrounding context. My dogs are companion dogs. They can stay in the house or go outside as they please, but most of the time they prefer to stay inside with the family. They get daily walks and structured exercise, and they are with me most of the time. Each situation is different, which is why in cases of aggression, it is usually best to consult with a professional trainer.

      Here are some articles on dominance from the ASPCA, the APDT, and Dr. Sophia Yin.

      Here is a bit more on guard dogs.

  19. vibhu says

    Hi, I am from India. I owned two dogs 1. rottweiler F, 3yrs 2. Lab mix M, 3.5 yrs.
    last year i picked up a stray female dog and brought her home now 18 months old.
    all the three dogs had gelled quite well together, however lately i have been noticing a very dominant behaviour in the stray. She growls and bites the Rottwieler whenever the rott tries to come near me. She doesnot do the same in case of the male dog.
    i am now trying to keep her(the stray) tied during the day hoping it will ease down the aggression.
    Otherwise she is extremely active till the level of being hyper.

    PLease suggest some help

    • shibashake says

      One common reason for conflicts between dogs is because of resources. When both dogs want the same thing at the same time, and neither is willing to back down, then a conflict will arise. This may occur over food and toys, but it may also occur over affection or attention from us.

      What helps with my dogs is to set up clear dog-to-dog interaction rules, especially rules over resources. When there are valued resources around, I make sure to supervise so that I can prevent conflicts or deal with them before they escalate into aggression.

      I also manage my dogs’ excitement levels by using play-breaks. Here is more on what I do with my dogs to help them get along.

      Tethering a dog for long periods of time, especially without supervision, can often lead to aggression. Here is why. Another article on tethering.

    • BanditSmokeyTebo says

      First and Foremost, I want to ask, are you showing them equal attention??? That could be one of the main reasons why she does that. Second, you must correct it immediately cause that can turn into a big fight. Seperating them when you are not home is a great idea, preferably a crate not being leashed up. Remember all dogs live as a pack so do not disrupt their pack stance as alpha and beta. But do correct the unnecessary behavior right away.

  20. Vanessa says

    I recently rescued Joey-a male (fixed) boarder collie/mix, about 1-2 years old. I also rescued another at the same time, a cattle dog/mix, who is only 6 months old, and allows Joey to be dominant at home. Joey knows he cannot be dominant over humans, and this is not at all an issue. However, only recently I’ve noticed him wanting to be dominant over other dogs, mostly males. The first incident was over a Frisbee.. another dog went to take it from Joey and it turned into a growling/wrestle fight (no bites, thank god- but it definitely was not playful). Since then he growls at other dogs and will be a bully, especially at the dog park. He gets alone fine with small dogs and others who submit, but not well with others who also want to be dominant. He put his head over another dog’s shoulders before but I very quickly removed him from the situation. I’ve been stricter with him at home and I thought he was doing better… but today I took him back to the park and there was a very dominant dog there (Doberman/mix) and the two did not get along at all… this one put his head on Joey’s shoulders which got Joey worked up. I am meeting with a trainer specialized on aggression/dominance this week but I was hoping someone could give me a few tips on dog-only dominance in the meantime. Keep in mind, it’s selective dominance- some dogs he has no problem with, others it’s an instant dominant issue.

  21. Melodie says

    Hi!

    I have a female cinnamon colored Chow-Chow. Up till last year, I had a black female chow as well. Eventually, I ended up having to separate them due to very vicious fighting. Unfortunately, the black chow chow has recently passed away (this past October). We have other dogs as well, a male her size (American Eskimo) whom she gets along splendidly with and a few smaller dogs whom she’s shown no ill feelings too. We recently (about three months ago) got a female Pekingese whom she has just recently started to fight with. I thought the aggression would have stopped when my black chow passed away (not due to fighting) and thought I was in the clear. I do think that it is a dominance issue, because the fighting always occurs when I’m around. It’s not often, but it’s scary and am afraid for the Peke. My chow knows “I’m BOSS” and does listen once I separate the fighting, but not until.

    Is there any help you can give me? Any tips? Thank you!

    Melodie

    • shibashake says

      Some things that help with my dogs-
      1. I set up clear dog-to-dog interaction rules that I slowly teach to each new dog. For example, there is no-stealing, no-humping, and I *do not* allow my dogs to correct each other. I supervise them very closely, especially when there is a new dog around, so that I can teach puppy what the rules are. If there are any conflicts, I will resolve them in a fair and consistent way. Supervision is very important because it allows me to redirect and stop behavior, before the situation escalates into a fight.

      2. I manage my dogs’ excitement level by using play-breaks, teaching them impulse control, and giving them many structured outlets for their energy.

      3. I create as many positive experiences as I can between my dogs and the new puppy so that they see her as an enhancement to their lifestyle, rather than as a competitor or an annoyance.

      Here is more on what I do while introducing a new dog.

      For fights and more serious cases of aggression, it is usually best to get help from a good professional trainer.
      http://www.apdt.com/pet-owners/choosing-a-trainer/

  22. Lise says

    Thanks for the great information! I have a 17 month old bull mastiff/african mastiff/ & possibly we think pitt bull. Henry has been fabulous except recently he has been going up to other males and resting his head over their neck…this has not been well received as you can imagine! I should have mentioned that Henry has not yet been fixed. Other than stopping him from going up to other males how can I stop this behavior? I want to get us back to hiking our local mountains but as it stands right now Henry is getting himself into too much trouble!
    Thank you!

    • shibashake says

      Dogs repeat behaviors that get them good results and stop behaviors that get them bad results.

      Some behaviors, such as humping, are self rewarding. For example, my Husky Lara likes to hump. Every successful hump she does, she gets rewarded by it simply because she was able to do it. Therefore, the more she does it, the more the behavior gets reinforced, and the more likely she will do it in the future.

      To stop her, I must make sure that she *never* gets rewarded for the behavior, i.e. never succeeds in humping another dog. I always stop her as soon as I notice her getting into humping position. She usually does this during play, so I stop play briefly, and get her to do some commands. In this way, she has a chance to calm down and refocus on me. If she keeps going back to humping, then I calmly say timeout and put her in a timeout area (temporarily).

      During walks, I have her on-leash. If she misbehaves badly during walks (e.g. leash bites, eats poop), then I end the walk and march her home. Later on, we may try again. In this way, she learns that-

      No humping = Play time and walk time continues,
      Humping and other bad behaviors = Play time stops or walk ends.

      Another possibility is to train a really strong recall. Here is a good list of recall training techniques from the ASPCA.

      Here is more on how dogs learn.

  23. Carlota says

    Hello:d I recently got a chow puppy(3weeks ago) and I have done a lot of research on his breed and training and so forth. But lately Mustang(puppy) has been showing some dominant behavior. He won’t let people correct him when he bites shoes, he won’t let us pet him if he is not in the mood. Butt hats pretty much it. I want to stop this behavior before it gets hectic. We do training daily and trick learning too. What should I do?
    Thank you for your time

    • shibashake says

      I had a similar experience with my Shiba Inu. I started out with aversive training techniques, including alpha rolls, leash corrections, and more. Sephy seemed to respond well to it at first, but then after a bit of time, his behavior worsened. He became very sensitive to handling and he would fight back whenever he got punished.

      I realized that he was not responding well to the aversive methods that I was using.

      What worked well with Sephy is to establish a consistent set of rules and a fixed routine. I stopped using aversive methods, and used the Nothing in Life is Free program instead to achieve pack leadership.

      For example, Sephy used to like biting on curtains. When he does that, I no-mark the behavior and then body block him away from the area. Then I get him to do something else. If he keeps going back to bite on the living room curtains, then he loses his privileges to roam freely in the living room and has to stay with me while I work in the kitchen or computer room. Sephy loves his freedom to roam, so it is a very valuable resource to him. Once he learned that-

      Biting curtains = Less freedom to roam,
      Biting chew toys = Play, attention, and more freedom to roam,

      he stopped biting on curtains. :D

      More on how dogs learn and the pros and cons of different dog obedience training methods.

  24. Rose says

    Hi!!! We are in need of help! My fiancee has a 3 year old black lab and I have a 3 year old Pomeranian and a 1 year old golden retriever. We are going to get married in 2 weeks and we decided to introduce our dogs in our new home that my fiancee has been living for a couple of days with his dog.

    As soon as the three met the black lab immediately went to the golden to smell and started to mark territory. As we went inside the house the lab became more dominant and aggressive. My dog was extremely submissive and was really scared. Obviously that was when my tension and fear started rising and we decided to leave the black lab outside the house and the other two inside.

    We knew the lab was a very dominant dog, but we didn’t think it would turn into aggression at other dogs that weren’t trying to be dominant towards him. He had met my Pomeranian a year ago and they got along very well. He never showed signs of dominance of aggression towards the Pom it was only to my golden.

    I really don’t want to live in fear for my dogs safety and we love them all very much and would like to live all together peacefully. Please help me to understand how we can control our labs intermale aggression Thank you!!

    • shibashake says

      Given that there is aggression, it is probably best to get help from a professional trainer so that everybody stays safe.
      http://www.apdt.com/pet-owners/choosing-a-trainer/

      Some things that help my dogs get along-
      1. I set up clear and strict dog-to-dog interaction rules. In the beginning, I supervise to make sure everyone follows the rules. In this way, each dog knows what to expect from the others.
      2. My Shiba Inu is more picky when it comes to greetings, so I make sure the new dog does not disturb him when he does not want to be disturbed. He also has his own space that he can go to.
      3. I create as many positive experiences as I can, so that my existing dogs will learn that the new dog is not a threat and is actually a big positive. I do group obedience sessions, properly supervise play sessions, etc. I try to maximize positive experiences and minimize negative encounters.

      Here is more on what I do to introduce a new dog.
      http://shibashake.com/dog/second-dog-introducing-a-second-dog

      I also try to stay very calm and positive. My dogs are very sensitive to my emotions. If I am fearful, they will pick up of that, become stressed themselves, and their behavior will worsen.

      However, each dog is different and each situation is different, so in cases of aggression, it is best to get help from a professional.

  25. Hillary says

    Hi, I have a border collie/mix with something I’m not sure of. He was a stray that showed up a about a year and a half ago. Well, I’ve been dating my bf since right after I got my dog and there have never really been any problems. My dog was abandoned and so now, he has abandonment issues. My boyfriend gets up and goes to work at 6 every morning and i usually sleep in until 10 before work. A couple of days ago my boyfriend was looking for his clothes in the dark, using the light of his phone, and my dog suddenly got up to attack him. Backed him up into a corner and everything. And I didn’t think anything of it except maybe my boyfriend startled my dog and my dog was just being protective of me. But I thought, my dog has snapped once or twice and I blamed that before on rough housing with him too hard. So decided to call the vet and have him neutered, which will take place tomorrow, hoping that would calm him down. But this morning, my boyfriend went to give me a hug and a kiss and my dog suddenly attacked him again. Didn’t bite him. But had him backed up into a corner again until I got to my dog. He is a little bit aggressive towards strangers, and I usually blame that on being protective of me since I ‘rescued’ him. And usually when my dog does something he’s not supposed to, I put him in his place by grabbing him and putting him down on the ground and holding him there with my knee on his neck until he calms down and submits. If he does it again, I’m worried that it might be worse and my dog will actually bite my boyfriendeven though my boyfriend backs up. Could this be a result of maybe the way the previous owners treated him? Or is he just being protective or showing dominance? I don’t want to have to put my dog down because he’s too aggressive and can’t be controlled. He’s really a sweet dog when he’s not feeling threatened.

    • shibashake says

      Hello Hillary,

      Here are a couple of articles on dominance and aggression-
      1. Aggression and Dominance in Dogs (UC Davis).
      2. Dominance and bad dog behavior.

      Re Helping my dogs get along with people:
      Two key things that help with my dogs-
      1. Creating a bond – My partner walks a dog in the morning, and also walks them during the weekends. He feeds them in the morning, and I do the feeding in the evening. He also plays with them, grooms them, and we do the training together. We agree on the house rules, and make sure we use consistent techniques to train them. In this way, our dogs create a bond with the both of us, and sees us both as part of their family.

      2. People desensitization exercises – I also do people desensitization exercises with my dogs so that they learn to view other people in a positive way, and also learn what to do when they meet people. Dogs do not know our human greeting rules, they do not know that we have thin skins, and they do not know our language. Therefore, it is up to us to teach them these things. Desensitization helps my dogs to be comfortable around people, and to use alternative behaviors for coping with stress when they feel threatened.

      The most important part with desensitization is to *always* start with a very weakened version of the stimulus, weak enough that our dog can tolerate it without losing control. With people, I can weaken the stimulus by using distance and making sure that the person is calm and totally ignoring my dog (no talking and no eye-contact). In this way, I can start to teach my dog new behaviors to use when in the proximity of people, and also to reassociate people with positive outcomes.

      Re Pinning a dog down until he submits:

      This is also called an alpha roll. It was something that I did with my Shiba Inu (Sephy) when he was younger and unfortunately, we did not have good results. Sephy became very sensitive to handling, he grew distrustful of people, he felt more threatened, and used aggression even more to protect himself. Here is a bit more on our experiences with the alpha roll.

      Later on, I discovered that this technique is very risky and can cause increased aggression in dogs.

      Professional help:

      Given what you describe, it sounds like it may be best to get some help from a professional trainer. Dog training is very context dependent, and a dog’s behavior depends a lot on his temperament, routine, environment, past experience, and more. To come up with an effective retraining plan, we want to identify the source or triggers of a dog’s aggression, and this is best done by a trainer who can meet with and observe our dog.
      http://www.apdt.com/pet-owners/choosing-a-trainer/

  26. Kimmi K says

    We have a 4 year old (1/2 Catahoula & 1/2 Plott Hound). She’s (Clyde) very dominant! And we are thinking about taking in our neighbors dog – who has been left behind twice. She (Ginger) is the sweetest craziest dog (we think part Jack Russell & who know’s what else). But she is dominant as well. Clyde will rip Ginger apart & we want them to get along. Clyde is very protective of our home & land. She really doesn’t get along with any other dogs – so far. Any other suggestions?

    • shibashake says

      Clyde will rip Ginger apart

      For more serious types of aggression, it is best and safest to get help from a professional trainer.
      http://www.apdt.com/pet-owners/choosing-a-trainer/

      In general, systematic desensitization exercises can be used to raise a dog’s instinct threshold, and teach him new and alternative ways for dealing with the stress of meeting other dogs. This is best done under the direction of a good trainer.

      I would retrain my existing dog first, and *not* introduce any big changes into his routine (e.g. a new dog) until I have the aggression under control.

  27. Lindsey says

    Hi! I was wondering if you could help me with some advice on my female siberian. She will be a year on May 17th. We don’t have any problems with aggression whatsoever, thankfully. However, I am afraid my girl is an alpha and I am worried it may be too late to break her. She will hump on me and other dogs frequently and I will tell her firmly to step, yet she still continues. She also will go in the garbage and I will catch her in the act and tell her to step, but she will stare at me and run away quickly with the garbage. She also will “punch” with her paws and demand play time and attention. She jumps up on everyone and the biggest problem is the house breaking! She was house broken completely at 10 weeks with no accident. Then she got a urinary tract infection and began going in the house. The urinary infection was treated immediately, yet she still continues to poop/urinate in the house multiple times a day even though she is let out constantly and I watch her go to the bathroom. I have her in an obedience class, but it isn’t helping the alpha behaviors. My girl is very smart and can sit, shake both paws, stay, down, and crawl; which is what the trainer in the class focuses on. I feel like I have spent endless amounts of money and time and nothing is working. I love my husky very much but it is very taxing on me until this problem is corrected.

    THANK YOU IN ADVANCE,

    Lindsey

    • shibashake says

      Re Saying ‘Stop’:
      In the beginning, the word “Stop” will mean very little to our dog. For it to have meaning, we will need to associate it with a consequence that means something to our puppy. Here is a bit more on “Stop” words and how I communicate with my Husky puppy.

      Re Punching and demanding attention:
      Dogs will repeat behaviors that get them good results and stop behaviors that get them undesirable results. Dogs often jump and punch because when they do that, we usually give them our attention. We may try to push them away, shout at them, move around, and more. All this moving around will likely get our dog more excited, and think that it is a fun game.

      What has worked well with my dogs is to withdraw my attention when they jump or bite.

      Here is a bit more on how I train my dogs not to jump on people.
      Here is a bit more on how dogs learn.

      Re Potty training:
      I would go back to potty training basics. Here are some things that I did to potty train my Husky puppy.

      Re Dog dominance:
      A bit more on dominance and bad dog behavior.

  28. Colette Hall says

    HI
    I wonder if you can help me.

    I have a 3 year old german spitz called Poppy, and I think she sees herself as alpha over my two youngest children – they are 4 and 8. She will let them walk her if I am not with them (if I am, she will bark constantly and keep looking to me) – we have a park next to the house that they go to. My main concern is that she growls and sometimes snaps at them. She is nervous about some things – she will outright attack the vacuum cleaner- I generally prompt her to leave the room when using it now. But the kids cant bring toys through on the floor, she will attack the toys. If she has a treat, they cannot go anywhere near her – even if she is in her crate with it ( where her bed is) she will growl. What can I do to get across that she is not alpha? Or what can I get the kids to do? I am worried that she will at some point go too far.

  29. john boyle says

    Can you help me ? I have a 12st Newfoundland Dog who is 3 years old. He has overtime (6 months or so) decided that he wont walk with me or some other family members.He uses his weight (hits the floor and wont move) until I head for home. How can I overcome this behavior ?

    thanks

    John

    • shibashake says

      Hello John,

      A common reason why a dog may want to stay home instead of going on walk is because of anxiety. Did something happen during his walks when the change in behavior started? Previously, did he enjoy going on walks? Does he have the same walk routine? Is there a particular place where he always sits and won’t move?

      When my dog has an issue with anxiety, I first try to locate the source of his stress. I look at commonalities in the environment, time-line, and more to identify what triggers his unexpected behavior. Once I identify the triggers for his behavior, then I can desensitize him to those triggers in a controlled and structured way. This teaches him new ways to cope with his stress, helps to build confidence, and also retrains him to associate a previously “bad trigger” with positive outcomes.

      Here is a bit more on dog anxiety problems.

      There are other reasons why a dog may stop and not want to move during walks, e.g. they want to watch people or other dogs, they want to sniff at something in a particular spot, they want to go in a different direction, etc. I always try observe my dog carefully so that I know where the change in behavior comes from. Once I know the source, I can come up with an appropriate plan to target the root of the problem, and change it for the long-term.

  30. Wendy says

    Hi,
    I have a 15 month old Labrador/Rottweiler dog. I am very confused as to what behaviour he is displaying. I do not know if it is dominance or fear. He is a lovely boy in the house he never leaves my side but when we go out for walks he seems to be a different dog. He becomes stressed at walking around corners and has on one occasion growled at someone coming around a corner in the opposite direction. He jumps at leaves moving and gets very stressed on a windy day! He Isin’t interested in being stroked by people outside and if someone attempts to stroke him or talk to him he will growl at them. I have spoke to a dog behaviour specialist and he seems to think that he is fiercely protective over me. Please help!

    • shibashake says

      Hmmm, how does he respond when people try to give him affection while in the house? How does he respond to house guests? Does he show similar behavior when he is walked by somebody else? Did this behavior just start or has he been this way from the beginning? Did anything change when the behavior first started?

      Dogs can get fearful or uncertain about new objects, new people, or new environments. New things are unknown, and may turn out to be dangerous. Socializing a dog to new objects, people, and experiences in a positive, structured, and supervised way, can help to build confidence and reduce stress.

      My youngest Husky was a bit fearful of people and new objects when she was young. She was especially wary of people on bicycles and skateboards. We were able to help her with her stress through desensitization exercises.

      Here is a bit more on dog anxiety and fears.

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